Kengo Kuma’s Timber-Wrapped Tower in Sydney, Australia | The Exchange

Kengo Kuma’s The Exchange in Australia

Ribbons of pastel wood wrap The Exchange tower in Darling Square, Sydney Australia. This is the first building of Japanese architect Kengo Kuma in Australia that has now opened to the public. SURFACES REPORTER (SR) presents the interesting details of the circular structure. Take a look:

Also Read: Kengo Kuma uses 20000 individual Granite Pieces for the Kadokawa Culture Museum facade

Spiraled With 20,000 Metres Of Wood

Kengo Kuma’s The Exchange in Australia

This six-storey building is cladded with 20,000 meters of light-coloured wood. The architected has arranged this in a “dynamic and exciting manner”, which allows passersby to get the snippets of activity within the building.

Kengo Kuma’s The Exchange in Australia

The building is accessible and recognizable from multiple directions.
 

The building is accessible and recognizable from multiple directions.

The design was first disclosed in 2016 by the architect as the main central point of Darling Square, which is located on western peripheries of the Sydney central business district in Darling Harbour. Aspect Studios-Australian landscape and urban design firm has designed 2,700 square meters of Darling Square.

kengo kuma- the exchange

The Characterful Formation

The building is accessible and recognizable from multiple directions.

The unique formation of The Exchange is formed by its six stunningly curved floorplates, surrounded by angled walkways.

The building is accessible and recognizable from multiple directions.

The outcome of this design is that the interior space of the building looks like a silkworm cocoon. And, the primitive façade of the buildings resembles a bird’s nest, making an oasis in the center of an urban jungle.

A Mixture of Programs

The building is accessible and recognizable from multiple directions.

Spread over an area of 6,680-square-metre, the building contains a "makerspace" to support creative and technology start-ups, a library, childcare center, and a market hall. There is also a rooftop restaurant and bar that gives wonderful views over the Chinese Gardens, Tumbalong Park, and Cockle Bay. Every floor plate was moved so that there are distinct views from each floor and the terraced housing.

The building is accessible and recognizable from multiple directions.

Architect Kengo Kuma is known for his playful use of timber. He is also the founder of Kengo Kuma and Associates, which has its headquarters in Paris and Tokyo.

 

*Photo Courtesy: Martin Mischkulnig.

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